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Writing means different things to me. I'm a storyteller, a book editor, and a songwriter. For me, it's like breathing.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Weird Word Wednesday

Diapason
noun  di·a·pa·son
  1. a :  a burst of sound <diapasons of laughter>
b :  the principal foundation stop in the organ extending through the complete range of the instrumentc (1) :  the entire compass of musical tones (2) :  rangescope diapason
 of her responses — Mindy Aloff>
  1. a :  tuning fork
   b :  a standard of pitch

Middle English, from Latin, from Greek (hē) dia pasōn (chordōn symphōnia), literally, the concord through all the notes, from dia through + pasōn, genitive feminine plural of pas all — more at dia-pan-


First Known Use: circa 1501

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Weird Word Wednesday

Diakinesis
noun  dia·ki·ne·sis
:  the final stage of the meiotic prophase marked by contraction of the bivalents
New Latin


First Known Use: circa 1902

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Monday, January 09, 2017

Monday Musings: New Release by Kelley Heckart--The Crow Maiden (Greek myths, shapeshifters, romance)

New book release! The Crow Maiden, Greek myths/fantasy/shapeshifters/romance
In Print and Kindle on amazon.com



Book Title: The Crow Maiden
Author: Kelley Heckart
Genre: Greek myths/fantasy/paranormal/shapeshifters/romance
Release date: 1/6/17
Page Count: 180
ISBN- 13:978-1541140615
ISBN- 10:1541140613
ASIN:  B01N1ZBAF1

Trade Paperback Buy Link on amazon.com: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1541140613/

Blurb

The Crow Maiden
Book 3: The Arcadia Series
(The Crow Maiden is a standalone story in the Arcadia Series)

She betrayed her goddess for him…
He betrayed her.
Plotting her revenge is her only solace. Until now.

Nahla is the Crow Maiden, an Arcadian, and once a priestess of Artemis. Now she is a captive, a being who lives in the shadows until her vile master the sorcerer-king Aramon summons her. Another releases her from the Shadowlands, and while he might be the champion she has waited for, the gods must be playing a cruel joke. Her champion is crippled.

An Achaean lord who once ruled a great city, Balin is a broken man. He has lost everything—his kingdom and his family. Revenge consumes him. Although wary of the mysterious, cold-eyed female who appears and claims he summoned her, she may be his only hope to exact vengeance on the king who ruined him, the same man Nahla seeks to destroy.

They are bound by revenge, and soon, both learn they are bound by much more, but the secrets she hides might tear them apart and ruin their only opportunity for vengeance—and their chance to love again.

“Ms. Heckart draws the reader into the pages and enchants them with her words.”
Karen McGill, Coffee Time Romance

Excerpt (PG):
Summoned from the Shadowlands, Nahla landed in a place of encircling darkness. Rays of light too weak to pierce the black shield glowed in the distance. Cold, damp air embraced her, penetrating her clothing and draping her body like a heavy winter cloak.
Footsteps echoed all around. She struggled to come to her senses, fighting disorientation. Seized by a wave of dizziness, she steadied herself on the hard, rough ground beneath her feet. The footsteps grew louder. They approached from the direction of the faint light.
He was coming.
She staggered backward and banged into a hard wall. Her arms extended, she moved to her right. Cold rock scraped her knuckles. She lunged left and grimaced as another firm, unforgiving surface stopped her other hand. Bound there by more than the walls, she waited in the stygian blackness.
Brandishing a torch, her summoner appeared and came toward her at a forceful pace. The fire blinded her, and she barely saw the glint of metal flashing in front of her.
Before she could evade the thrusting weapon, a cold, heavy blade touched her neck. The unfamiliar feel of a sharp blade against her skin made her freeze out of instinct, not because she was afraid of death. Nahla had already died once.
She waited for the weapon to slice through her flesh. A foreboding prickle raised the fine hairs of her nape. Something was different about this summoning. Her master would never kill her. He would never be that kind to her and set her free.
The one who wielded the blade dropped the torch in order to hold the weapon with both hands. The flaming light burned low and sputtered behind him or her, though she sensed whoever had brought her here was male by his leather, un-flowery scent and by the strength he possessed holding the heavy, brutal blade. Shadows concealing her summoner remained, and his deep, ragged breaths spoke of anger and despair.
“Who are you? How did you get in here?” he asked, his voice gruff.
“You summoned me.” She remained guarded, the cold metal still caressing her neck, but excitement fluttered in her stomach at the significance of this unusual summoning.
The silence was palpable, broken only by his now heavy and uneasy breathing. After a few moments, he growled, “If that is so, then you are not what I asked for.”
Desperation, frustration, and anguish filled his voice. She was in the true place. All she knew was death and misery and sorrow.
“I came because I was summoned.”
“Just go away.” He removed the blade from her neck, picked up the fallen, smoking torch, and retreated through the low, narrow opening toward the beckoning glimmers of light from a far away chamber.
She followed him and stepped forward toward the opening. Another dim chamber filled with dust and cobwebs greeted her. Glancing back at the black, unpleasantly cold space she’d landed in, she suppressed a shudder and then ducked into the other brighter, small chamber. Piles of dusty blankets, a war shield, and dull-looking bronze plate armor filled one corner. Nothing about the solemn room looked familiar to her. She walked past uneven rock walls like the ones found in caves. An earthy scent like that of dark, damp places permeated the air. Caves were for creatures like her that roamed in the shadows, the unseen realm between life and death, the place she called the Land of Sorrows, not for humans that had no need of darkness.
This summoning wasn’t true. Only one man could call her forth from the Shadowlands. Was she finally free of her tormentor? No, the bond to her master remained, lingering like a loose tether, but she also sensed she couldn’t travel too far from this stranger. Did this unusual event have anything to do with her constant yearning for the life that had been stolen from her? She could reclaim all she’d lost if she found a champion to kill her creator and master. It had seemed impossible.
Until now…

****

Multi-published author Kelley Heckart lives in Arizona with her musician husband, dog and a number of backyard “pets.” Her stories reflect her passion for ancient and medieval time periods, storytelling and the supernatural. Inspired by the ancient Celts, her tales are filled with fierce warriors, bold women, otherworldly creatures, magic, and romance. When not writing, she works as a freelance editor and practices target archery. She can be found online at http://www.kelleyheckart.com/

To sign up for my newsletter and receive special notices like new book releases and giveaways only for my subscribers: http://kelleyheckart.com/Contact_Kelley_Page.html

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.




Wednesday, January 04, 2017

Weird Word Wednesday

Diaeresis
noun  di·aer·e·sis
Definition of diaeresis
plural 
diaereses
\-ˌsēz\
  1. 1:  a mark ¨ placed over a vowel to indicate that the vowel is pronounced in a separate syllable (as in naïve or Brontë) — compare umlaut
  2. 2:  the break in a verse caused by the coincidence of the end of a foot with the end of a word
Late Latin diaeresis, from Greek diairesis,literally, division, from diairein to divide, from dia- + hairein to take

First Known Use: circa 1611

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

Diadelphous
adjective  di·adel·phous 
:  united by filaments into two fascicles —used of stamens

First Known Use: 1807

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Monday, December 26, 2016

Monday Musings: The allure of Christmas movies

The Hallmark Channel has been playing Christmas movies since just after Halloween. I used to make fun of Christmas movies. They were always too sappy for me. I’m more of a National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation kind of girl—making fun of the whole holiday festivities.
However, lately I’ve been getting sucked into these Christmas movies. Have I finally softened on the holiday spirit of Christmas? Maybe. Just a little.



There is something about Christmas, how this time of year affects people, bringing them closer, and the Christmas movies add a touch of magic that is already in the air. I think I understand now why I keep watching them. Christmas movies make us feel better in a world where every day there is some disaster in the news.

Merry Christmas, everyone.

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.








Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

Diachronic
adjective  dia·chron·ic 

:  of, relating to, or dealing with phenomena (as of language or culture) as they occur or change over a period of time

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Monday, December 19, 2016

Monday Musings: The frustrations of formatting a book in Microsoft Word

I've been pulling my hair out trying to remember how to format my new book for publishing. The hardest part is putting the headers and page numbers on the right pages in Microsoft Word. None of the tutorials I found were helpful because my problem seemed to be unique. Most of them showed instructions on how to add headers and page numbers. I know how to add them. That's easy. I don't know how to add them to the right pages, how to skip the front matter and first page of a chapter. LOL

I think this tutorial was the most helpful because it focused on the importance of using section breaks correctly to get your headers and page numbers on the right pages.

This is how I spent the last few days and why I forgot all about a new post for today. Hopefully the above tutorial link might help another writer and keep them from being frustrated.

I guess what this taught me is that self-publishing is not easy. Unless you want to pay someone to do all the formatting, you have to learn how to do it yourself. If I did it more often, I'd remember how I did it before, but I don't, so every time I am ready to publish a new book I have to try and re-learn how to correctly add the headers and page numbers. Maybe I could take better notes for the future. LOL


Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.



Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

Diabesity
noun  di·a·be·si·ty 
Medical Definition of diabesity
1.  :  obesity associated with diabetes 


Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Wednesday, December 07, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

Diablerie
noun 

1.  1:  black magic :  sorcery
2.  2a :  a representation in words or pictures of black magic or of dealings with the devil
3.  b :  demon lore
4.  3:  mischievous conduct or manner
Origin and Etymology of diablerie
French, from Old French, from dïable devil, from Late Latin diabolus — more at devil


First Known Use: 1751

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

Deucalion
noun  Deu·ca·lion \d(y)ü-ˈkāl-yən\
Popularity: Bottom 20% of words
Definition of Deucalion
:  a survivor with his wife Pyrrha of a great flood by which Zeus destroys the rest of the human race
Origin and Etymology of deucalion
Latin, from Greek Deukaliōn


First Known Use: 1565

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Monday, November 28, 2016

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

desacralize
verb  de·sa·cral·ize \(ˌ)dē-ˈsā-krə-ˌlīz, -ˈsa-\
Popularity: Bottom 30% of words
Definition of desacralize
Desacralized desacralizing
transitive verb
:  to divest of sacred qualities or status

desacralization play \(ˌ)dē-ˌsā-krə-lī-ˈzā-shən, -ˌsa-\ noun

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

deracinate
verb  de·rac·i·nate \(ˌ)dē-ˈra-sə-ˌnāt\
Popularity: Top 40% of words
Definition of deracinate
Deracinated deracinating
transitive verb
1
:  uproot
2
:  to remove or separate from a native environment or culture; especially :  to remove the racial or ethnic characteristics or influences from
deracination play \(ˌ)dē-ˌra-sə-ˈnā-shən\ noun

Origin and Etymology of deracinate
Middle French desraciner, from des- de- + racine root, from Late Latin radicina, from Latin radic-, radix — more at root


First Known Use: 1599

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, November 09, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

deodar
noun  de·o·dar \ˈdē-ə-ˌdär\
Popularity: Bottom 20% of words
Definition of deodar

:  an East Indian cedar (Cedrus deodara)

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Monday, October 31, 2016

Monday Musings: Halloween

Halloween used to be about the ancient Celts and the thinning of the barriers between the realm of the dead and the land of the living. People wore masks to hide their identities from wicked spirits intending them harm. In modern times wearing a costume is more about the chance to be something or someone you normally wouldn't be. If you want to be sexy, it's okay to do that on Halloween. No repercussions. Or you can be a something scary or funny. Today Halloween is all about fun.

The true meaning of All Hallow's Eve/Samhain may be lost in the past, but there's nothing wrong with celebrating it the way we do now. I love going to Halloween parties and seeing the latest costumes. There's something magical when you meet someone for the first time in costume. All the barriers are down. Just like the ones between the two worlds. I've had some of those magical encounters on Halloween.

Anything is possible on a night when monsters, humans, and all manners of creatures mingle.


Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

denarius
noun  de·nar·i·us \di-ˈner-ē-əs\
Popularity: Bottom 30% of words
Definition of denarius
plural denarii play \-ē-ˌī, -ē-ˌē\
1
:  a small silver coin of ancient Rome
2

:  a gold coin of the Roman Empire equivalent to 25 denarii

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

demagogue
noun  dem·a·gogue \ˈde-mə-ˌgäg\
Popularity: Top 1% of lookups
Simple Definition of demagogue
: a political leader who tries to get support by making false claims and promises and using arguments based on emotion rather than reason


When the ancient Greeks used dēmagōgos (from dēmos, meaning "people," and agein, "to lead") they meant someone good-a leader who used outstanding oratorical skills to further the interests of the common people. Mid-17th-century writers such as Thomas Hobbes and John Dryden-and, later, Jonathan Swift-employed the English word that way. But, at the same time, the word took a negative turn, coming to suggest one who uses powers of persuasion to sway and mislead.

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

deke
verb \ˈdēk\
Popularity: Bottom 30% of words
Definition of deke
Deked dekeing
transitive verb
:  to fake (an opponent) out of position (as in ice hockey)
intransitive verb
:  to deke an opponent
deke noun


Deke originated as a shortened form of "decoy." Ernest Hemingway used "deke" as a noun referring to hunting decoys in his 1950 novel Across the River and into the Trees ("I offered to put the dekes out with him"). About a decade later, "deke" began appearing in ice-hockey contexts in Canadian print sources as both a verb and a noun ("the act of faking an opponent out of position").

      Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.

Monday, October 10, 2016

Monday Musings: Is it the thought of dying that really pushes us to live?


This time of year always has me reflecting on life. Maybe it’s the dark half of the year and the shorter days that send my thoughts into deeper places than usual. I’ve been thinking about what it means to be human and mortal. Something that we will probably never truly understand. Here are some things to ponder:

It’s the thought of our fragile mortality that drives us to hurry and get something accomplished before it’s too late. If we were immortal and had all the time in the world, then we wouldn’t be motivated to do anything. What’s the hurry to do something great if you have forever to do it?

The greatest invention wouldn’t have been created by immortal men.

We think death is a punishment for being human, but maybe it’s what makes us truly human.

It tests us.

It dares us…

To feel what we normally wouldn’t. Like passion, inspiration, and motivation. If we didn’t have that feeling of getting old and dying, would we have the urgency to fall in love?

Without death looming, we would be nothing but unfeeling shells. And that’s no way to live. Is it?

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth, magic & romance.


Wednesday, October 05, 2016

Weird Word Wednesday

dejecta
noun plural  de·jec·ta \di-ˈjek-tə, dē-\
Popularity: Bottom 20% of words
Definition of dejecta
:  feces, excrement
Origin and Etymology of dejecta
New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of dejectus


First Known Use: circa 1829

Kelley Heckart
Otherworldly tales steeped in myth & magic.